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Arctic Plaeatu – That Which Will Never Die

By: David E. Gehlke



Blistering.com: Conceptually, you place a great deal of importance on your childhood experiences. As you get older, are these memories more vivid, or harder to remember?

Divirgilio:
It depends. I have a good supply of bad memories, I haven't spent an easy childhood. But I am convinced that one day I will be a father and then I'll be on the other side of the fence. You know, each of us has deep wounds within himself. The best memory of my childhood is my father and my mother in the car while we sing a song, together...

Blistering.com: Favorite line on the album: “Music’s like a memory that never dies.” Does this correlate to your relationship with music?

Divirgilio:
Yes, because if you write good music you can't really die, ever.

Blistering.com: I’m especially struck by “Big Fake Brother.” What sort of significance does this track have? Does it have any connection to Orwell’s 1984 novel?

Divirgilio:
My song refers to a type of behavior. Many people call you "brother" but when you turn around from the back they will destroy you and your life. I have known many such people.

Blistering.com: Because you’ve done a split with Les Discrets, do you feel that invariably, you’re going to be lumped in with bands like the aforementioned Les Discrets and even Alcest? Not bad company to be in, eh?

Divirgilio:
I think everyone has his own character, each of us plays the music he has inside and I don't find many similar connotations. Alcest is a great band, and his music is very different from mine! Les Discrets is a great band, and in my view, Les Discrets is a very personal project. Perhaps an average listener might confuse the fact that both they sing in French language but if you listen carefully you'll notice for example that every band has its own sound, every band has its own EQ and each band has its own history behind it. I think it is possible that each of us has influenced the other but each of us has our own personality and responsibility. Arctic Plateau is an Italian project and you can hear it in the air, I am geographically far away from them, but I appreciate Alcest and Les Discrets. They have courage and I have great respect for each of them and our audience...I don't believe that a listener can get confused between each of us. Our split was a time to celebrate our tastes and our music. We (Fursy and I) are friends and fans of our respective projects. We have the support of a great label and we are very lucky. We know it and we appreciate it. That's all.

Blistering.com: Why do you think so many rock/shoegaze bands are accepted within the metal community?

Divirgilio:
I think it also depends on the mode in which a band shows its influences, but if you want to know the truth, I'm also tired of the “shoegaze” term. There is only one way of doing things: the best way. If you do your job well everything will be fine. Classifications or catalogs are things that serve to the market; when I write a song I don't think in these terms. Maybe when I was younger, but not now anymore. The music is constantly evolving and we cannot enclose a genre in a sub-genre, we must wake up. As I said before everyone has their own influences and this comes from our listening, but we must move forward, we must move forward! I love a certain type of metal music and I love a certain kind of shoegaze but I really don't like ska music. So what, nothing changes. The world continues to move forward, you know. The reality is that the public today is very intelligent and can recognize good music, no matter if it's metal music or shoegaze/metal/industrial, the important thing is that it is real music, real music and that can give strength and energy to their lives, and that this could be the soundtrack of their life. The rest is all talk and fashion stuff.

Blistering.com: Do you feel any sort of ties to the metal scene?

Divirgilio:
I love some kind of metal, I am a collector of black metal vinyl (old True Norwegian) but not only metal. I tell you this; I started thanks to some Randy Rhoads solos when I was very young, I studied Alex Skolnick's solos when I was a student, then I loved the first four albums of Darkthrone and some other important metal albums. Now, I occasionally turn on my mesa boogie DC2 + and I take my old 1987 Charvel Jackson and I play metal riff and solos in my room, but I do it for me. Stop. Maybe 20 years ago, in 1992, I did it more often but I think it's normal; at that time I studied metal structures and played in various bands, new wave and metal and you know, in 1992 I was 19 years old! Many metal musicians plays blues music or jazz for example, intimately. Alex Skolnick [Testament] is now a good jazz musician and I listen his jazz solos or metal solos equally. Things change, but each of us has his loves. The metal was a beautiful and fundamental school for myself, like jazz and other forms of preparation for the development and construction of its own musical language on its instrument.

Blistering.com: Other than Arctic Plateau, what other projects are you working on?

Divirgilio:
I don't have much time, never. I'm very busy now; in Italy I am working with some musicians. For the rest of time I'm working a lot for preparing some good Arctic Plateau live shows.

Blistering.com: Finally, what’s on the agenda for the rest of 2012?

Divirgilio:
I want to play live, as I said I'm working a lot for organizing that. I'm searching a new bass player and I'm working in the rehearsal room...

 www.arcticplateau.com

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